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Bookmark and Share Paper 2941

Theories of the Emergence of Colonial Peruvian Andean Spanish (1533-1821)
Peter Gullette
292-302 (complete paper or proceedings contents)

Abstract

In the history of the Spanish of the Andean region of this time period, the present study shows that some of the conservative phonological factors were also present in the Peninsular Spanish of the time. With this the present study shows that there indeed is a link between the Peninsular Spanish of the time and what had then become "Andean Spanish." While many scholars treat the history of coastal Peruvian Spanish (such as Limeño Spanish) and Southern Peruvian Andean Spanish as one language history, this study argues for a separation of the two varieties, based on unique historical, cultural and linguistic factors, highlighting the emergence of Southern Peruvian Andean Spanish (SPAS) as a separate language variety during the colonial period. This study also briefly reviews the social and bilingual factors that are presented as arguments about when Andean Spanish arose. Escobar (2001) claims that it could not have arisen during the colonial period; other authors disagree with her (Rivarola 1989). The present study looks at three sociohistorical factors from Mintz' (1971) framework, which are the population demographics of the region, the social status and mobility in the region, and the community settings of the region in order to review the history of the language in the region. The present study gives historical and phonological reasons why it is certainly possible for Andean Spanish to have begun as a separate variety in this time period, despite Escobar's claims. The study also examines two theories of the development of Andean Spanish, namely the Indigenous Theory of Language Contact and the Andalusian Theory of American Spanish. The paper also examines two phonological traits, namely, the system of sibilants and the system of laterals in Southern Peruvian Quechua and Southern Peruvian Andean Spanish.

Published in

Selected Proceedings of the 16th Hispanic Linguistics Symposium
edited by Jennifer Cabrelli Amaro, Gillian Lord, Ana de Prada Pérez, and Jessi Elana Aaron
Table of contents
Printed edition: $310.00